Published in September 2015, Bob Crane: The Definitive Biography contains the first-hand testimonies, memories, and recollections from 200 prominent individuals from Bob Crane's life. Family, friends as far back as grade school, and coworkers in radio, television (including many from Hogan's Heroes), theatre, and film have helped tell his complete story. In addition, the hard cover edition contains more than 200 rare family and professional photographs, some never before published or seen by the public until now. Discover the truth! If you think you know Bob Crane before reading this book, you don't know him at all. Author profits will be donated to various charities in Bob's memory.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Official Statement about the Re-Investigation of Bob Crane's Murder
"We—my coauthors and I, members of Bob Crane's family, his friends, and his colleagues—are always hopeful that one day, the true identity of Bob's murderer will be known and justice can be served. However, this recent investigation did not reveal any groundbreaking information or provide a resolution, and the subsequent media coverage did nothing more than bring unnecessary heartache to many who knew, loved, and cared about Bob. We do not discuss or endorse any speculative theories as to who may have committed the crime. We encourage those who want to know more about Bob Crane to discover his complete and true life story in Bob Crane: The Definitive Biography. All author profits are being donated to various charities in Bob's memory."
—Carol Ford, author, Bob Crane: The Definitive Biography

Wednesday, November 23, 2016

Official Statement about the Re-Investigation of Bob Crane's Murder

Below is our official statement regarding Fox TV news anchor John Hook's new investigation into the murder of Bob Crane.

   "We—my coauthors and I, members of Bob Crane's family, his friends, and his colleagues—are always hopeful that one day, the true identity of Bob's murderer will be known and justice can be served. However, this recent investigation did not reveal any groundbreaking information or provide a resolution, and the subsequent media coverage did nothing more than bring unnecessary heartache to many who knew, loved, and cared about Bob. We do not discuss or endorse any speculative theories as to who may have committed the crime. We encourage those who want to know more about Bob Crane to discover his complete and true life story in Bob Crane: The Definitive Biography. All author profits are being donated to various charities in Bob's memory."
Carol Ford, author, Bob Crane: The Definitive Biography


Saturday, October 29, 2016

Rod Serling's Night Gallery: 'House—With Ghost'

Night Gallery painting for
"House—With Ghost"
Nearly everyone I know likes a good ghost story (some more than others!). This is particularly true in the month of October as we build up to the scariest night of the year, Halloween. During this time, our fears of the unknown are heightened, and we're more acutely aware of things that might go bump in the night.

People are naturally intrigued about the Afterlife. What happens to us when we die? Do our souls live on in another dimension? Do some spirits hang around to either help or torment the living? Do ghosts really exist? We may not have the answers to such questions, but Hollywood certainly provides us with scores of chilling entertainment to feed our morbid curiosity.

Rod Serling successfully explored the supernatural and other elements of horror throughout his career, and his Night Gallery series (1969-1973) continues to send shivers down the spines of millions. Each painting on display in the Night Gallery has a tale of terror to share, and separately, these pieces of art correspond with their own segment in every episode. (Check out the paintings for yourself here.)

On November 17, 1971, Bob Crane guest-starred in the first segment of a Night Gallery episode: "House—With Ghost." In this segment, Bob played Ellis Travers, who is unhappily married to his wife Iris (Jo Anne Worley) and living in London. It just so happens that Iris has a peculiar hobby: conducting seances during dinner parties and playing with Ouija Boards in the hopes of making contact with restless spirits. This gives Ellis an idea. 

With the help of Mr. Chichester (Eric Christmas), a local historian and realtor of sorts, Ellis decides to find a house in the English countryside, and to please his wife, he wants one that is haunted. After describing to her what he considers the perfect house, Iris is convinced. They soon move out of their apartment and settle into their new home.

Ellis Travers (Bob Crane) comforts his wife, Iris (Jo Anne Worley),
after she is frightened by a menacing spirit.

But Ellis has more on his mind than just owning a haunted house. He's staging an elaborate plan, where Iris will eventually appear to become besieged by an unfriendly ghost, and after losing her mind and then her balance, will fall down the spiral staircase to her death. With Iris out of the way, Ellis will be free to move in with Sherry (Trisha Noble), a woman with whom he is having an affair. 

As Ellis hoped, they are not alone in their new house, and their ghost—Mr. Canby (Bernard Fox)—soon makes his presence known. And over time, his paranormal activities become increasingly more harrowing.

Ellis Travers (Bob Crane) feigns sadness after receiving bad news
from his wife's doctor (Alan Napier).

As part of his scheme, Ellis also talks to a doctor (Alan Napier) and asks him to examine Iris. But the doctor brings bad news: Iris has a rare medical condition and doesn't have long to live. Ellis, however, feels better than ever about his wife's impending demise. Now he doesn't need the unsettled spirit of Mr. Canby to do the dastardly deed for him; he can let nature take its course.

Mr. Canby has other ideas. He continues to torment Iris, eventually pushing her down the staircase to her death. Angry, Ellis confronts Mr. Canby, claiming he had changed his mind because she would have died of natural causes soon anyway. Mr. Canby is unaffected, and he presents Ellis with a bill for services rendered. For the rest of his life, Ellis must pay Mr. Canby's still-very-much-alive mistress a hefty sum to keep her happy—or else.

The ghost of Mr. Canby (Bernard Fox) presents Ellis Travers
(Bob Crane) a bill for services rendered.

I enjoy this episode for many reasons. First, I am one of those people who loves the Fall season, Halloween, and all the frightful festivities and entertainment that go along with it. And of course, that includes a good ghost story! Bob Crane also enjoyed Halloween, and each year, when his kids were little, he took them Trick or Treating around the neighborhood.

I also love that Bernard Fox costars with Bob in this episode. These two actors and friends worked alongside each other often. Fans of Hogan's Heroes know Bernard Fox as Royal Air Force Colonel Rodney Crittendon, one of the few who kept Hogan off balance. What a lot of people don't know, however, is that throughout the 1970s, Bernard Fox worked with Bob on stage in many productions of Beginner's Luck (they both starred in its initial 1970 run in Chicago), and the pair received rave reviews in the press for their theatre performances. Bernard Fox genuinely liked "old Bob," as he called him, and was greatly saddened by the news of Bob's death.

Bob Crane with Bernard Fox in
Beginner's Luck.

This episode of Night Gallery is also one of Bob's first performances following the cancellation of Hogan's Heroes, which ended after six seasons on April 4, 1971. Originally scheduled to go one more season, Hogan's Heroes fell victim to what became known as the Rural Purge—a sweep of series cancellations by networks to clear the way for television shows that dealt with modern issues rather than just provide light humor.

In my opinion, Bob played Ellis Travers, who is a despicable character, quite well. This episode of Night Gallery marks the start of Bob's decision to play characters that were out of his comfort zone (those that were not comedy roles). Bob often appeared as the villain when guest-starring on various series, including Police Woman, Ellery Queen, and Gibbsville, to name a few, and this was a far cry from the United States Army Air Force hero for which he was best known. But most could only view Bob as Hogan—and nothing else. Many years would pass before directors, critics, and the public would begin to see beyond his Colonel Hogan persona and accept Bob as a versatile actor. His role on The Love Boat in January 1978 may be his best dramatic performance. However, his murder a few months later cast an eerie shadow over his Love Boat performance, and as a result, he does not receive the proper credit he rightfully deserves.

It's worth taking a second look at Bob Crane's acting roles post-Hogan's Heroes and viewing his performances with an open mind, minus the stigma of June 29, 1978, and the media blitz that followed. Rod Serling's Night Gallery: "House—With Ghost" is a great place to start!




This post is part of the Terror TV Blogathon hosted by the Classic TV Blog Association.
Click the image above for more fabulous entries in this blogathon.

Tuesday, October 18, 2016

The Last Few Months in Review and Future Plans

It's true. Everyone needs a hiatus, including me. The past year has been a whirlwind for me in promoting Bob Crane: The Definitive Biography, as well as hopping from one place to another for book signings and presentations. And I've loved every minute of it!

But between juggling all of that, plus working at a demanding full-time job and on other writing projects, as well as spending time with my family and having some sort of a personal life (ha! What's that?!), I needed to take a little step back. That shouldn't be confused with abandonment, however! I'm still here, always ready and willing to combat the negative and tell Bob's true, complete story.

Past Events
Carol Ford with awesome 2016 MANC vendor neighbors
and new friends Josh Kennedy (left) and Mark Redfield
(Poe Forevermore).
I was thrilled to once again participate as a vendor at the Mid-Atlantic Nostalgia Convention, held in Hunt Valley, Maryland, from September 15-17, 2016. Over those three days, I reconnected with some great folks I knew from last year's convention, met a few people I knew through social media, and made some terrific new friends! You can browse through a selection of photos from the convention by clicking here. While I didn't present this year, I had a blast talking with people one to one at my table in the vendor hall. I'm looking forward to being a regular participant at the convention!

A few days prior to the Nostalgia Convention, I gave a full presentation at my hometown library in Gloucester County, New Jersey. It was a great success, and I have grown to love talking before a crowd. This comes as somewhat of a surprise to me because in the past, public speaking would usually make me very nervous, and I'd get cold feet! 

Carol Ford with Mitchell Hadley, owner of
It's About TV: Adventures in Classic TV
and AmericanCulture
, at the
2016 Mid-Atlantic Nostalgia Convention.
A favorite story I like to tell is the time I met Arlene Martel, who played Tiger on Hogan's Heroes. Arlene, who was a major contributor to Bob's biography and a tremendous supporter of our work, invited me, along with two of my dear friends, as her special guests to the 2007 ICON Convention in Long Island, New York. We spent the day with her in the vendor hall and then went to her presentation. Just before her talk, Arlene pulled me aside and specifically instructed me to ask her one simple question: "What was it like working with Bob Crane on Hogan's Heroes?" 

Following her talk and a short film composed of her works, she took questions from the audience. Several people raised their hands. I shrunk down in my seat! She answered questions about her role as Spock's bride on Star Trek, among other questions. But I was frozen! Finally, as she was wrapping the session up, she asked if there were any more questions from the audience. She looked directly at me and said, "Anyone? ANYONE!" My friend kept nudging me to talk, but to no avail! I was not budging, and it was not going to happen. Arlene was a little miffed at me following her session, but she was so sweet and kind, she didn't dwell on it. Arlene passed away on August 12, 2014, and I often think of that moment at her session, smile, and say, "I've come a long way, haven't I, Arlene?"

What's in Store for the Future?
In addition to more author events, we've got something big starting to simmer on the front burner. At this time, I can't divulge any details, but I promise you, you're gonna love it. For now, I'll just say...stay tuned!

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

'Best Wishes, From Hogan'

Bob Crane takes time to sign autographs
at a parade c. 1967 (notice he is wearing
a drum and holding drumsticks).
Although it may seem glamorous, I imagine being a celebrity is not always easy. I only know the smallest, briefest extent of being in the public eye. Most fans of Bob Crane: The Definitive Biography are beautiful souls who I appreciate and try my very best to answer, even when I'm stretched to the limit in my own life. I've also had a handful of people who crossed the line and ventured into the scary realm of cyber-stalking. But by and large, the majority of fans are good, honest, lovely people. Without them, celebrities (and authors!) would not achieve or sustain their success. 

Bob Crane didn't care much about money or cars, or about being "famous." But he certainly adored his fans, and he tried so very hard to make them happy. Whether he was sitting in a restaurant enjoying dinner, standing in line at the supermarket, or enjoying a day at Disneyland with his children, Bob would stop what he was doing and scribble his name on a napkin, receipt, ticket, or whatever was handed to him. "Best Wishes, From Hogan," was his signature sentiment above his autograph.

Bob responded to almost all of his own fan mail. After Hogan's Heroes became a hit, and especially during the run of the series, he received tons of mail. How much is unknown, but what I do know is that he took time out of his already hectic schedule to answer as much of his fan mail as he could, rather than hand it off to an assistant or secretary. He likely would have answered all of it—because he would have genuinely wanted to—if only there were more hours in the day. To the best of my research, he was not one to use an "autopen," but instead, would sit for hours personally answering letters or pre-signing 8x10 glossies so that they would be ready for him to personalize and send off to the eager fan.

That's impressive. I absolutely love my author events and meeting people who want to learn Bob's true story, and I can honestly tell you that some of the best moments of my life have been experienced during book signings. But I will also say that signing even just fifty books over a two-day event is quite a feat. Signing autographs is fun, but it's also exhausting!


I love these two pictures so much!
The little girl standing there, 
in her little
Pettifor dress and pixie haircut, waiting 
ever so patiently
for Bob to sign her 
autograph book—and then, success!
She walks away triumphantly with Colonel Hogan's autograph!
She reminds me so much of me at that age.

I give Bob tremendous credit for his treatment and appreciation of his fans. His personal life was often interrupted by a good-natured fan who charged up out of nowhere wanting to get Colonel Hogan's autograph. And Bob would comply. Some celebrities can take on an air of entitlement, and they can seem unapproachable—almost god-like. Not so with Bob Crane. As many told us for his biography, Bob knew he was a star, but he didn't act like it—not on the set and not with his fans. He wasn't a "Bob Almighty," and despite his fame, he never forgot his humble roots. He was just Bob Crane, who just happened to be famous, and who treasured his fans, wanting to make their day just a little brighter by personally answering them.

Thursday, August 4, 2016

If You Like Johnny Carson on 'The Tonight Show,' Thank Bob Crane!

When most people think of The Tonight Show, they think of legendary Johnny Carson, who brought entertainment and laughter to millions over his thirty years as host (1962-1992). Carson became a late night television talk show phenomenon. But what most people don't realize is that in 1962, instead of Carson taking over as host, the then-reigning "King of the LA Airwaves" almost became the "King of Late Night."

Bob Crane wraps up a portion of his KNX-CBS
Radio Show (May 1964).
In 1962, right at about the same time Jack Paar was stepping down from The Tonight Show, Bob Crane was blazing a radio trail at KNX in Hollywood. He had built a dynamic name for himself in broadcasting, having maintained a successful radio career since 1950 on both U.S. coasts. After several years at KNX, Bob was given a new component to his popular morning show: live, unrehearsed celebrity interviews that aired daily. Bob was personable, smart, quick-witted, charismatic, funny, and a gifted interviewer. When a celebrity or notable person went on the air with Bob, informative hilarity ensued. He captivated his guests, who clamored to be on his show for the public and professional exposure he guaranteed them. It didn't take long for Bob to command the new hour-long segment and be hailed as the premiere celebrity interviewer of the time. 

Bob Crane with Jerry Lewis on his
KNX-CBS Radio show (c. 1963).
Used with permission from Scott Crane.
"The Bob Crane Show" was a tremendous hit for KNX, and according to salesmen working at KNX at the time, Bob made a ton of money for the station. Television studio producers noticed and had their eye on him, and when The Tonight Show producers started searching for a replacement for Paar, they approached Bob. Not only was Bob a natural behind the mic, but he was also no stranger to The Tonight Show, having appeared as a guest during Jack Paar's tenure and during the interim between hosts.

Bob balked at their offer, not wanting to transition his radio show to television and become pigeonholed as an emcee or TV talk show host because of his ambition to pursue an acting career. They were persistent, however, even paying for Bob to travel to New York (with his wife, Anne) to guest host for a week in 1962.

But when he returned to Los Angeles, his answer was still the same. No.

Bob didn't want to host a television talk show. He wanted to act. So instead of jumping at the chance to become the official host The Tonight Show, he accepted small, lesser-paying roles on television, such as on The Dick Van Dyke Show and The Donna Reed Show, all so he could hone his acting skills.

Bob Crane as a guest on The Merv Griffin Show
January 1966
In 1965, just before the premier of Hogan's Heroes, Bob told the press: "Art Linkletter and a lot of other good friends in broadcasting told me I was a fool not to branch out into the television emcee business and maybe become another Jack Paar or Johnny Carson. But I couldn't see it. Once you become identified as a TV emcee, you're dead as an actor, and actor is what I wanted to be more than anything else."

NBC considered other hosts for succeeding Jack Paar, but it was only after Bob Crane turned down their offer—repeatedly—did they give Carson serious consideration. I often say to people, if you like Johnny Carson on The Tonight Show, thank Bob Crane!

I always enjoyed Johnny Carson on The Tonight Show. I liked Jay Leno and also enjoy watching Jimmy Fallon as host. But when I watch, I catch glimpses of what could have been Bob's wit and humor in the host's antics and interview traits. And I can't help but wonder what The Tonight Show would have been like if Bob Crane had said yes.

~~~

Bob Crane on The Tonight Show, with Jack Paar (c. 1960):




Bob Crane interviews Jerry Lewis over KNX-CBS Radio (recorded c. 1962; re-aired 1976):



Wednesday, July 13, 2016

Happy Birthday, Bob Crane!

Many consider the number 13 to be unlucky, and those with triskaidekaphobia will do anything and everything to avoid this number at all costs. But for Bob Crane, who was born on Friday, July 13, 1928, it became what he called his lucky number.

Today, Bob would have been 88 years old, and in his short life of just shy of fifty years, he accomplished so much, and in fact, much more than most people do in an entire lifetime if they lived to be a hundred. Of his impressive career climb, Bob once stated: "As far as I know, nobody has followed the line of succession from radio-to-television-to-movies as I have in the past ten years or so. It's a long process, but I knew what I wanted and where I hoped to go."

And he was right. Bob always set goals for himself, and putting his mind to it, he achieved them. How many entertainers do you know worked in every medium of the entertainment profession? Bob was successful, and in some cases, a dynamic success in music, radio, television, stage, and film.

Bob Crane was:
  • An adept drummer and musician since his childhood, and he produced one record album.
  • A pioneer in the radio and broadcasting industry, and often referred to as a radio genius by his colleagues.
  • A successful television and film actor who took his acting seriously—more seriously than most people realize or given credit for. He performed his roles so well that he made it look easy, when in fact, he worked very hard at perfecting every role.
  • A talented theatre actor and director, who used his time on stage to further enhance his acting and directing skills.
  • A versed writer, who authored several news columns, a television pilot, and a variety show stage production based on what he envisioned was the Hogan's Heroes finale, entitled Hogan's Heroes Revue. He also rewrote sections of Beginner's Luck, and shortly before he died, he hinted at wanting to write his autobiography.
  • An avid reader who kept himself informed of every aspect of the entertainment and music industries. As the Nashua Telegraph published in 1966, "Bob Crane is one of the best informed persons on the world of entertainment, subscribing to and reading all trade publications and reading every book on the market concerned with the entertainment industry."
  • Self-taught and a self-starter, if he didn't know how to do something, he would take the time to learn how on his own.
  • Extremely devoted to his family. He loved them very much, and what he wanted most was for them to be happy and safe, and for there to peace and harmony.
  • A philanthropist and a natural helper. If someone needed advice or assistance, he was there. In addition to donating much of his time and talents to many charities and organizations regularly, he also helped out his family, friends, and colleagues whenever he could, even if just by imparting his words of wisdom to them.

In Bob Crane: The Definitive Biography, as well as on this blog and elsewhere on our social media sites, I quote a passage from an audio recording Bob sent to his cousin, Jim Senich, who at the time was building his own radio career in Connecticut. Bob advised: "Eventually, what you're looking for is gonna happen, and by the time it does happen, you'll be that much better along the way to what you should be. Don't get discouraged, and just keep on plugging along, and what you want will eventually be yours. You know, there's nothing to stop it if you just keep on working hard. And by working hard, I mean doing the best job you possibly can. Everything happens for the best, and I believe it completely."

These are powerful words, and words that can be applied even today and in any situation. As for Jim, he took his cousin's advice seriously. He went on to achieve his own successful radio career, including working for  WICC in Bridgeport, Connecticut, as Bob did before him. As Jim talked with Linda and me for Bob's biography, he described his cousin, whom he still calls Bobby, to us this way: "The family really appreciates what you're doing for Bobby. We sure do. Bobby was just a big teddy bear. He was; he was a big teddy bear, and everybody loved him, and they didn't want to hear any bad things. Strange, people probably think he walked around with horns sticking out of his head, but he was a good guy."

Jim's son Eric Senich, who also maintains a rewarding career in radio, has graciously made Bob's audio letter to his father available for the public to enjoy. Take a few minutes and listen to Bob—not as a radio personality, not as Colonel Hogan on Hogan's Heroes, not as an entertainer—but as a person reaching out to help a member of his family by offering sound advice.

This is a pure example of the real Bob Crane. Today, on his birthday, Bob's family, friends, and colleagues, as well as his fans, continue to miss him very much. We will never know what treasures he would have given us had he lived on past his fiftieth birthday. But what we do know is what he gave to us during his fifty years of life: talent, joy, kindness, compassion, and generosity. And it was extraordinary.

Sunday, July 10, 2016

Bob Crane: 'My Drumming'

Bob Crane plays drums, as his second wife
and Scott's mother, Sigrid Valdis (Patricia Olson),
and Freddy the Chimp join him
on the set of Hogan's Heroes
Bob Crane was just eleven years old when he first discovered the one thing that he would hold dear to him for the rest of his life: his drums. Wherever he went, his drums and drumsticks went with him, whether it was in school, on the radio, in his Hogan's Heroes dressing room, on television guest appearances, and on the road. He played his drums constantly both for enjoyment and to relieve stress. Hogan's Heroes costar Robert Clary recalled it was smart for the producers to allow him to play drums in his dressing room, stating it was not only a way for him to relax between scenes, but everyone always knew where to find him (just follow the drums!).

There is no question that Bob was a talented drummer. Music producer Stu Phillips, who produced the album Bob Crane, His Drums and Orchestra Play the Funny Side of TV, and also arranged many of the numbers on the album with Bob, talked with us about Bob's musicianship. When making the album, Bob was capable of keeping up with the orchestra's professional studio musicians—some of the best in the industry, brought a lot of fun to the recording sessions, and also had a blast creating the album. As Stu said, the look on Bob's face on the album cover says it all—he was having the time of his life! (Details of our interview with Stu Phillips are included in Bob Crane: The Definitive Biography). 

Bob Crane practices his drums in his
Hogan's Heroes dressing room.
Just as much as I love listening to Bob's airchecks, I also love to listen to his drumming. I have a great appreciation for music, and drums run in my family. My brother-in-law, both of my nephews, and some of my dearest friends are all drummers. They are a unique breed, drummers. And by observing them, I can absolutely envision what Bob had been like when it came to his drums and music.

Fans of Hogan's Heroes know that Bob played drums in two episodes of the series: in "Flight of the Valkyries" (season one), where he plays timpani, and in "Look at the Pretty Snowflakes" (season six), where he lets loose on a drumset during the number "Cherokee." But he also played drums for the Hogan's Heroes theme that rolls during the opening and closing credits, as well as all of the ancillary music during each episode. Knowing that neat interesting bit of classic television trivia makes watching the show even more fun to watch!

A few years ago, I had the honor and pleasure of staying with Scott Crane and his family as I spent three days going through all of his father's personal belongings as part of researching Bob's biography. Among the many items I sorted through were several cassette tapes that held his radio airchecks, random conversations, and a tape that Bob simply labeled, "My Drumming." This tape contains a solid two hours of Bob practicing or performing on drums, and it is, for lack of a better word, amazing. And that's not just because I am a fan or his biographer. This tape is further evidence of just how good of a drummer Bob was. It also shows just how much he loved playing drums and—like everything he did in his career—worked very hard to always improve his skills.

On January 10, 1967, Bob appeared on The Red Skeleton Hour, during which he played drums to a classical arrangement of "Norwegian Wood" by The Beatles. This is a rehearsal track of that number that Bob taped and saved on the "My Drumming" cassette. On The Red Skeleton Hour, the audience's applause drowns out some of his drumming, but here, there is no audience interruption because Bob recorded it during a rehearsal. Enjoy!


This recording is courtesy of Scott Crane.